Alan B. Cohen
Editor

Christopher F. Koller
Publisher

Tara Strome
Managing Editor

2-year Impact Factor: 7.425
Journal Citation Reports® 2018 Rankings: 1/81 (Health Policy & Services); 1/98 (Health Care Sciences & Services)
5-year Impact Factor: 7.440

March 2019 (Volume 97)

From the Editor

Original Scholarship

  • Featured Article

    The Economic Value of Education for Longer Lives and Reduced Disability

    Patrick M. Kreuger, Ilham A. Dehry, Virginia W. Chang

    Although it is well established that educational attainment improves health and longevity, the economic value of this benefit is unknown. Researchers estimate that the economic value of education for longer, healthier lives is comparable to or greater than the value of education for lifetime earnings. A template that assigns an economic value to the health benefits associated with education or other social determinants can allow policymakers to prioritize those interventions that yield the greatest value for the population. Read more

  • Public Meets Private: Conversations Between Coca-Cola and the CDC

    Nason Maani Hessari, Gary Ruskin, Martin McKee, David Stuckler

    A new Early View study in The Milbank Quarterly shows The Coca-Cola Company’s efforts to influence the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study is based on emails and documents obtained via the Freedom of Information Act. The emails demonstrate the company’s interest in gaining access to CDC employees in order to lobby policymakers and frame the obesity debate by shifting attention and blame away from sugar-sweetened beverages. Read more

  • Access by Design, Benefits if Convenient: A Closer Look at the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework’s Standard Material Transfer Agreements

    Michelle Rourke

    Prior to 2007, developing countries were expected to provide virus samples to the World Health Organization (WHO) without any guarantee that they would have access to the benefits associated with their use—namely, vaccines and antivirals. To remedy this, the WHO adopted the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework (PIP Framework), the only pathogen-specific international access and benefit-sharing instrument. In this analysis of the PIP Framework, the author finds that it will safeguard access to virus samples, but may not be as effective in delivering vaccines and antivirals to countries in need. Read more

  • Service Delivery Models to Maximize Quality of Life for Older People at the End of Life: A Rapid Review

    Catherine J. Evans, Lucy Ison, Clare Ellis-Smith, Caroline Nicholson, Alessia Costa, Adejoke O. Oluyase, Eve Namisango, Anna E. Bone, Lisa Jane Brighton, Deokhee Yi, Sarah Combes, Sabrina Bajwah, Wei Gao, Richard Harding, Paul Ong, Irene J. Higginson, Matthew Maddocks

    In an era of unprecedented global aging, a key priority is to align health and social services for older populations in order to support the dual priorities of living well while adapting to a gradual decline in function. Researchers aimed to provide a comprehensive synthesis of evidence regarding service delivery models that optimize quality of life for older people worldwide. They identified two overarching classifications of service models—integrated geriatric care and integrated palliative care—that maximized older people’s quality of life as they neared the end of life. Read more

  • What Words Convey: The Potential for Patient Narratives to Inform Quality Improvement

    Rachel Grob, Mark Schlesinger, Lacey Rose Barre, Naomi Bardach, Tara Lagu, Dale Shaller, Andrew M. Parker, Steven C. Martino, Melissa L. Finucane, Jennifer L. Cerully, Alina Palimaru

    For the past 25 years, health care providers and health system administrators have sought to improve care by surveying patients about their experiences. Recently, policymakers acted to promote this learning by deploying financial incentives tied to survey scores. The authors, who examined the potential of systematically eliciting narratives about experiences with outpatient care, found that rigorously elicited narratives hold substantial promise for improving quality of care in general and in patients’ experiences with care in particular. Read more

  • Ranking Hospitals Based on Preventable Hospital Death Rates: A Systematic Review With Implications for Both Direct Measurement and Indirect Measurement Through Standardized Mortality Rates

    Semira Manaseki-Holland, Richard Lilford, An P. Te, Yen-Fu Chen, Keshav K. Gupta, Peter J. Chilton, Timothy P. Hofer

    There is interest in monitoring avoidable or preventable deaths measured directly or indirectly through standardized mortality rates (SMRs). In this systematic review, researchers examined studies that use implicit case note reviews to estimate the range of preventable death rates observed, the measurement characteristics of those estimates, and the measurement procedures used to generate them. Estimates for preventable death rates using implicit case note reviews by clinicians are quite low, suggesting that SMRs will not work well to rank hospitals. Read more

  • Learning From History About Reducing Infant Mortality: Contrasting the Centrality of Structural Interventions to Early 20th-Century Successes in the United States to Their Neglect in Current Global Initiatives

    Amiya Bhatia, Nancy Krieger, S.V. Subramanian

    Prior to 2007, developing countries were expected to provide virus samples to the World Health Organization (WHO) without any guarantee that they would have access to the benefits associated with their use—namely, vaccines and antivirals. To remedy this, the WHO adopted the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework (PIP Framework), the only pathogen-specific international access and benefit-sharing instrument. In this analysis of the PIP Framework, the author finds that it will safeguard access to virus samples, but may not be as effective in delivering vaccines and antivirals to countries in need. Read more