Notes on Contributors

David Chess is an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. He is also chairman and executive director of Project Patient Care—a patient advocacy organization that studies the impact of health care policy on patient care—and the CEO and CMO of Enhanced Care Initiatives, a Focused Disease Management Company. Dr. Chess has an interest in the impact of pharmaceutical utilization management on people with chronic diseases. He continues to practice medicine and geriatrics in Trumbull, Connecticut.

Jon B. Christianson is the James A. Hamilton Chair in Health Policy and Management at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. He is an economist with extensive research and teaching experience in the financing and delivery of medical care. He has published widely in the areas of health insurance and managed care, employer health care purchasing, rural health care, mental health care, and care process improvement, and he has collaborated with health care providers in a variety of practice settings to evaluate new treatment approaches. Dr. Christianson serves on a number of different editorial boards and scientific advisory panels and directs the Center for the Study of Healthcare Management at the Carlson School of Management.

Janice Clarke is a project director in the Department of Health Policy at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. Her current research interests include the areas of disease management, quality improvement, and utilization management.

Roger Feldman is the Blue Cross Professor of Health Insurance and a professor of economics at the University of Minnesota. He was a Marshall Scholar at the London School of Economics, and his research covers the organization, financing, and delivery of health care with a focus on health insurance. He also studies competition among health care providers and insurers. He is currently evaluating several “consumer-driven” health plans, including one where employers contract directly with providers to purchase health care services, and the early experience of a defined-contribution health plan. His experience in health care policy includes serving on the senior staff of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, where he was the lead author of a chapter in the 1985 Economic Report of the President. From 1988 to 1992 he directed one of the four national research centers sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and recently he advised CMS on a demonstration of competitive pricing for Medicare M+C plans. He is a regular contributor to journals in economics and health services research and has received four “best paper” awards from the Association for Health Services Research and the National Institute of Health Care Management. He has been a consultant to the U.S. Department of Justice and several state regulatory agencies regarding health plan mergers and ownership changes.

Neil I. Goldfarb is the program director for research in the Department of Health Policy at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. He is responsible for developing the department’s research strategy, designing studies, and supervising research staff and fellows. His research interests include quality measurement and improvement, employers’ roles in fostering quality, and pharmacoeconomic evaluation.

Stephen J. Kunitz is a professor in the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. His research focuses on population history, the sociology of medicine, epidemiology, and the social determinants of disease. Much of his field experience has been with Navajo Indians and other indigenous peoples.

Jeanne M. Lambrew is an associate professor in the Department of Health Policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. She is also a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress. She was previously a policy official in the Clinton administration. Her research focuses on public health insurance programs, financing, and the uninsured.

Malcolm Maclure is a professor in the School of Health Information Science at the University of Victoria in British Columbia and an adjunct professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is also a Health Research Distinguished Scholar at the Michael Smith Foundation. His research interests include evaluation of drug insurance utilization management policies, programs and tools for educating physicians on prescribing, use of evidence in chronic disease management programs, and application and innovation of epidemiological methods for health services research. He works closely with the PharmaCare program in the British Columbia Ministry of Health Services and with the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Vittorio Maio is a project director in the Department of Health Policy at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, where he is responsible for managing and developing health policy research studies. His current research involves examining the evaluation of inappropriate prescribing for the elderly, the implications of formulary restrictions, and the effects of patient prescription cost-sharing on drug consumption and utilization of medical care.

Lisa R. Metsch is an associate professor and director of the Sociomedical Sciences Research Group in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Miami School of Medicine. Her research focuses on HIV prevention and treatment, substance abuse policy research, and women’s health. Her current research, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, focuses on the development, implementation, and evaluation of behavioral interventions addressing primary and secondary prevention needs of persons living with HIV and at risk for HIV.

David B. Nash is a professor and chairman of the Department of Health Policy at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. He is internationally recognized for his work in outcomes management, medical staff development, and quality-of-care improvement. His national activities include appointment to the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations’ Advisory Committee on Performance Measurement and the Foundation for Accountability Board, and membership on the board of directors of the Disease Management Association of America.

Irena Pesis-Katz is a doctoral candidate in health services research in the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine.

Laura Pizzi is an associate director of research in the Department of Health Policy at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. She is responsible for the design and oversight of research projects, development of departmental policies and procedures, and contribution to the department’s research strategy. Her research interests include the areas of outcomes analysis, medication usage and policy, prescribing informatics, and health-related productivity.

Harold A. Pollack is an associate professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. He has been a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at Yale University and has taught health management and policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. His research has focused on the interface between poverty policy and public health. His recent research concerns HIV and hepatitis prevention efforts for injection drug users, substance use disorders among welfare recipients, infant mortality prevention, and child health. He has served on to two committees of the Institute of Medicine.

Adam R. Roumm is a project coordinator in the Department of Health Policy at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. His research interests include public policy in health care, value-based purchasing, medical error reporting, quality improvement, formulary management, and value-based reimbursement.

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Volume 83, Issue 1 (pages 181–184)
DOI: 10.1111/j.0887-378X.2005.00341.x
Published in 2005