Notes on Contributors

Notes on Contributors

Benigno E. Aguirre is associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. His professional fields of interest are ethnic and racial relations, collective behavior, and social movements. Dr. Aguirre recently was the coauthor of an article on occupational prestige in the health care delivery system.

Connie L. Arnold is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University.

Alain Belanger is a research assistant in the population program of the Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado at Boulder. Among his professional interests are multistate demography and population geography. A forthcoming article by Mr. Belanger applies multistate life tables to female marital history.

Kathy Dietrich is a graduate assistant in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. Sociological theory, sociology of culture, and macrosocial organization represent her current fields of work.

Lih-jiuan Fann is a research assistant in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. Her professional interests center on social gerontology, social inequality, and advanced social statistics.

Yuichi Imanaka serves on the Faculty of Medicine in the Department of Public Health at the University of Tokyo. A physician, his professional interests center on studies of quality of life, quality of health care and cost versus benefit, effect, and utility outcomes. Last year Dr. Imanaka published a two-part article on compliance and medical practice.

Vernma M. Keith is assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. Her professional interests currently focus on the effects of life events and social support on the health and well-being of the elderly. Dr. Keith is the coauthor of a forthcoming scholarly article on gender differences in social support among older adults.

Peter Kemper is senior fellow at the National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment. His primary fields of interest include long-term care policy, nursing home costs, and community care. Dr. Kemper is currently at work on an analysis of lifetime use of nursing homes and its implications for long-term care financing.

James M. Lepkowski is senior study director of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. His current fields of professional interest include survey research methods, contingency table analysis, and health surveys generally. Dr. Lepkowski recently published a study of the treatment of wave nonresponse in panel surveys.

John Niederhauer is a research assistant in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. His current professional interests center on theory construction, power, and social psychology.

Andrei Rogers is professor of geography and director of the population program of the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Elderly migration and settlement, mortality and health forecasting, and mathematical demography are his current fields of work. Dr. Rogers this year was the coauthor of a paper on forecasting mortality using a parameterized time-series approach.

Richard G. Rogers is assistant professor of sociology and research associate in the population program of the Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado at Boulder. His professional interests focus on demography, aging, and medical sociology. Dr. Rogers recently published a study on ethnic and birthweight differences in cause-specific infant mortality.

Noralou P. Roos is professor of community health sciences at the University of Manitoba and career scientist with Canada’s National Health Research and Development Program. Her professional interests center on physician practice patterns, developing systems of health statistics, and studying utilization patterns over time. Dr. Roos has written recently on variability of outcomes of specific medical procedures.

Evelyn Shapiro is associate professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences of the University of Manitoba. Her primary field of work is the study of the elderly and their use of health services. Ms. Shapiro and Robert B. Tate recently published an analysis of changing health care, comparing physician, hospital, nursing home, and home care use by two elderly cohorts.

Robyn I. Stone is a research fellow at the National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment. Informal care-giving, issues affecting elderly women, and long-term care policy form the corpus of her current professional interests. Dr. Stone recently was the coauthor of an article on the competing demands of employment and caregiving to disabled elders.

Robert B. Tate is a statistical consultant in the biostatistics consulting unit of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Manitoba. Within biostatistics, his fields of work center on longitudinal data analysis and epidemiologic methods.

Lois M. Verbrugge is research scientist at the Institute of Gerontology of the University of Michigan. Along with measurements of social disability, her primary fields of work are male/female differences in health and mortality, and osteoarthritis and its impact on physical and social functioning. Earlier in 1989 Dr. Verbrugge published an article on the recent, present, and future health of American adults.

Fredric D. Wolinsky is professor of sociology and professor of humanities in medicine at Texas A&M University. His professional fields of work include analysis of health services utilization, public policy, and longitudinal methods. Dr. Wolinsky is the author of the forthcoming volume Health and Health Behavior among Elderly Americans: An Age-stratification Perspective.

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Volume 67, Issue 4 (pages 507–515)
Published in 1989