Notes on Contributors

Notes on Contributors

Christine E. Bishop is senior research associate at the Bigel Institute for Health Policy in the Heller Graduate School, Brandeis University. Her interests currently focus on the economics of health and long-term care, including the growth of home health expenditures.

Patricia A. Butler is a consultant to the Center for Health Services Research of the University of Colorado’s Health Sciences Center. Trained as a lawyer, her professional and scholarly fields of work include health care for the indigent and uninsured, and quality assurance in long-term care.

Patricia Day is senior research officer of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Policy at the University of Bath, United Kingdom. She is the author (and coauthor with Rudolf Klein) of numerous articles on the British National Health Service, and has also written widely on the development and implementation of British health care policy.

Avi Dor is a research associate at the Urban Institute, Washington, D.C. In addition to studies on Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements and insurance, his professional interests include economic modeling of AIDS-related behavior and health care financing in developing countries.

Lisa C. Dubay, a research associate at the Urban Institute, works on the nursing home industry and the industry’s response to reimbursement incentives. She also has a professional interest in the prospective payment system’s effects on home health industry utilization.

Patrick J. Fox is principal analyst at the Institute for Health & Aging of the University of California, San Francisco. His current fields of work include the sociology of science and long-term care policy. Dr. Fox has also written studies recently on geriatric services and community mental health centers.

John Holahan is director of the Health Policy Center at the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C. Physician payment systems, hospital cost containment, and Medicaid and health insurance for the poor are among his current professional interests. Earlier this year, Dr. Holahan coauthored an article on Medicare mandatory assignment.

Genevieve M. Kenney is a research associate in the Health Policy Research Center at the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C. Her fields of work include determinants of length of stay in hospitals, home health care utilization, and health care financing.

Rudolf Klein is director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Policy and Professor of Social Policy at the University of Bath, United Kingdom. The author of numerous works on the politics of consumer representation, complaints against doctors, and the British welfare system, Professor Klein this year published a second, revised edition of his volume The Politics of the National Health Service.

Robert E. Schlenker is associate director of the Center for Health Services Research at the University of Colorado’s Health Sciences Center in Denver. His current interests in health economics center on health care reimbursement policy and long-term care. Dr. Schlenker recently was the coauthor of an article on swing-bed hospital costs and reimbursements.

Michael C. Thornton is assistant professor in the Department of Afro- American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His professional fields of work include racial and ethnic influences on behavior, informal care-giver networks among ethnic elderly, and components of racial group identity.

W. Pete Welch is senior research associate at the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C. Health maintenance organizations and physician payment systems are among his primary professional interests. Dr. Welch published an article on prospective payments to medical staffs earlier this year.

Shelley I. White-Means is assistant professor in the Department of Economics at the Fogelman College of Business and Economics, Memphis State University. Her fields of work include ethnic diversity and the use of medical and family health care systems. Dr. White-Means and Dr. Thornton this year are the authors of a multifactorial analysis of two minority groups’ emergency room use.

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Volume 67, Issue 1 (pages 169–170)
Published in 1989