Notes on Contributors

Lawrence O. Gostin is executive director of the American Society of Law and Medicine and adjunct professor of health law at the Harvard University School of Public Health. He has devoted his attention to the study of law and health policy, AIDS and human rights and ethics in health care. Mr. Gostin is the editor of AIDS and the Health Care System.

Patricia A. King is professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center. Her field of interest is law, bioethics, and public policy. Ms. King has been particularly interested in the implications of race, ethnicity, and gender for policy in the area of human reproduction. She is the author of “The Past as Prologue: Race, Class and Gene Discrimination,” to be published in Using Ethics and Law as Guides, edited by George Annas and Sherman Elias.

Robert J. Levine is professor of medicine and lecturer in pharmacology at the Yale University School of Medicine. His work has focused on the doctor-patient relationship and the ethics of research involving human subjects. He is the author of “Medical Ethics and Personal Doctors: Conflicts Between What We Teach and What We Want,” which appeared in the Journal of Clinical Ethics in 1990.

Mark H. Moore is a professor at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He has spent the past two decades examining drug and crime control policy. He is the co-author of Beyond 911: A New Era for Policing.

Kenneth E. Warner is professor and chair of the Department of Public Health, University of Michigan. His research has focused on tobacco policy and the economics of health promotion and disease prevention. His “Tobacco Industry Science Advisor: Serving Society or Selling Cigarettes?” appeared in the American Journal of Public Health in 1991.

Read on JSTOR

Volume 69, Issue 4 (page 663)
Published in 1991