Notes on Contributors

Ronald Bayer is a professor at the Columbia University School of Public Health. He has been interested in the relationship between ethics and politics in the making of public health policy. Mr. Bayer is author of Private Acts, Social Consequences: AIDS and the Politics of Public Health.

Denise B. Kandel is professor of public health in psychiatry at Columbia University. She has been especially concerned with the epidemiology and natural history of substance use, as well as with the risks and consequences of such behavior. She is the co-author of “Friendship Networks, Intimacy, and Illicit Drug Use in Young Adulthood: A Comparison of Two Competing Theories,” which appeared in Criminology (1991).

William Kornblum is professor of sociology and director of the Center for Social Research at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His fields of interest include urban anthropology and youth and social problems. He is the co-editor of In the Field: Readings in the Field Work Experience.

Harry G. Levine is associate professor of sociology at Queens College and at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He has published widely on the history and sociology of alcohol and drugs. He is currently completing a major study on the history of the alcohol question in America and Europe to be published by Basic Books.

Gerald M. Oppenheimer is associate professor in the Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences at Brooklyn College, City University of New York. He has been interested in the history of medicine and especially the history of the HIV epidemic. He is the co-author of “AIDS and the Crisis of Health Insurance,” which appeared in AIDS and Ethics.

Craig Reinarman is associate professor of sociology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His field of interest is drug law and policy and the social construction of drug problems. He is co-author of Cocaine Changes.

Charles Winick is professor of sociology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He has been a student of drug dependence, deviant behavior, and mass communications.

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Volume 69, Issue 3 (page 527)
Published in 1991