Notes on Contributors

W. Todd Bartko is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His current research interests include the delivery of mental health services to children and adolescents and the mental health of children and adolescents at risk for psychopathology.

David A. Bartsch, a researcher at the Colorado Division of Mental Health in Denver, is primarily interested in evaluating programs and systems of care in the public mental health system. Currently, Mr. Bartsch is studying the needs and outcomes of client “types” within the system of care.

Michael Calloway is associate director of mental health services research at the Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is interested in the use of network analysis and interorganizational relations in program evaluation, and he is working to create models that combine individual- and system-level attributes for assessing program effects.

Anita Saranga Coen is a research associate at the Colorado Division of Mental Health, Denver. Her primary interest is in mental health service system research on individuals with serious mental illness, particularly multiple perspective-stakeholder data collection and instrumentation, specialized interviewer training, and comprehensive treatment outcome, including cost.

Martin D. Cohen is executive director of Technical Assistance Collaborative, Inc., in Boston. Mr. Cohen was the deputy director of the RWJF Program on Chronic Mental Illness.

Jean Demmler is a National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD) research fellow at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and a consultant with the Colorado Division of Mental Health in Denver. Ms. Demmler was the Colorado field coordinator for a study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health on mental health service networks in the RWJF sites.

Mark Foster is a researcher at the Colorado Division of Mental Health, Denver. He has applied multivariate methods and computer technologies in his research on alcohol and drug abuse and on neonatal conditions and development, among other topics. Currently, Mr. Foster is comparing innovative and traditional methods as well as models for analyzing, representing, and understanding change.

Richard G. Frank is an economist and professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University. Among his interests are mental health care, the economics of child health services, and the role of non-profits in health care.

Gail Gamache is adjunct assistant professor at the Social and Demographic Research Institute, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. In addition to the problem of family burden, she is interested in parenting issues among persons with mental illness.

Martin Gaynor is assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management and the Department of Economics, Johns Hopkins University. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Mr. Gaynor is interested in the public financing of mental health care, the economics of medical group practice, physician contracting, and hospital costs.

Howard H. Goldman is professor of psychiatry, director of mental health policy studies, and codirector of the Center for Mental Health Services Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Bal-timore. Dr. Goldman’s main interest is in the organization and financing of care for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness.

Marjorie A. Gutman is senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton. Her major responsibilities are to develop and oversee evaluations, research studies, and targeted research initiatives, particularly the social health areas of substance abuse, homelessness, violence, and mental health.

Anne M. Hendrick is a research assistant at the Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University. She has examined housing needs and policy pertaining to disadvantaged populations. Recently, Ms. Hendrick has focused on housing for persons with severe mental illness and housing policy for disadvantaged families with children.

Keith Kaneda is a sciences discipline specialist at the Homewood Computing Information Center, Johns Hopkins University. Recently, he has done statistical programming for housing studies under the National Evaluation of the Program on Chronic Mental Illness.

Anthony F. Lehman is associate professor of psychiatry and director of the Center for Mental Health Services Research at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Dr. Lehman is interested in the development of innovative programs and assessment of outcomes for persons with severe mental illness. His recent work has been in quality-of-life assessment, substance abuse comorbidity, and treatment recommendations for schizophrenia.

Thomas G. McGuire is a professor in the Department of Economics at Boston University. He studies payment systems for health and mental health services. Mr. McGuire’s current research is on payment methods for hospitals and physician services.

Scot W. McNary is a research assistant at the Center for Mental Health Services Research and the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Currently, he is working on his PhD dissertation in clinical-community psychology.

Sandra J. Newman is acting director of the Institute for Policy Studies and research professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins University. She is studying the housing needs of persons with severe mental illness and exploring the impact of the housing assistance system on families with children.

Joseph P. Morrissey is professor of social medicine in the School of Medicine and deputy director for research at the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is interested in the fields of medical sociology and mental health services research, particularly interorganizational network approaches to service system design and evaluation.

Diane C. Patrick is a researcher with the Colorado Division of Mental Health in Denver, and was the field coordinator for the Colorado Treatment Outcome Study. Her research has been conducted in the public and private sectors; she has studied health programs for the elderly and adolescents as well as health services in rural areas.

Robert I. Paulson is a professor at the Graduate School of Social Work, Portland State University, Oregon. He is coprincipal investigator of two service system research projects funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. Recently, he has published work on service system integration and network analysis. Mr. Paulson directed a specialized mental health training program at the University of Cincinnati for six years.

Leticia T. Postrado is a biostatistician at the Center for Mental Health Services Research, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Her research interests include evaluation of programs designed for the chronically mentally ill, validation of quality-of-life assessment instruments, and factors that affect the quality of life of individuals who are chronically mentally ill.

James D. Reschovsky is a research fellow at the Agency for Health Care Policy, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland. His main interests are in housing and long-term-care policy. Recently he has been studying the demand for nursing-home care and the use board-and-care homes for the disabled elderly.

M. Susan Ridgely is associate director of the Mental Health Policy Studies Program, Center for Mental Health Services Research, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. She is interested in the organization of programs and systems of care for people with severe mental illness, especially those who are dually disabled by severe mental illness and alcohol and drug abuse problems.

Dee Roth is chief of program evaluation and research in the Ohio Department of Mental Health, Columbus. She has been principal investigator on two recent projects, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, on homelessness and mental health service systems and outcomes. Ms. Roth has been a leader in the development of state mental health research programs, and she has worked actively with the National Association of State Mental Health Programs.

David L. Shern is director of the Bureau of Evaluation and Services Research in the New York State Office of Mental Health, Albany. His recent work focuses on how system and program interventions are related to client outcomes. He primarily studies adults with serious and persistent mental illness in state service systems.

Miles F. Shore is Bullard Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and scholar in residence at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Dr. Shore is interested in organized systems of care for mental disorders in both the public and private sectors (including managed care) as they influence changes in mental health policy. He was part-time director of the national program office of the RWJF Program on Chronic Mental Illness.

Stephen A. Somers is associate vice president of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, where he works on national health policy reform issues and the financing of services, particularly those based in the home and community for people with chronic health conditions.

Richard Tessler is a professor at the Social and Demographic Research Institute, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His most recent work has been on the connections between mental illness, family, and homelessness; the measurement of family burden; and evaluating strategies for reducing family burden.

Nancy Z. Wilson is director of special research at the Colorado Division of Mental Health, Denver. She has been examining the impact of service system changes upon client outcomes and community perceptions of the delivery system. Ms. Wilson’s particular interest is in how research findings and decision support systems are used in management decision making and in formulating mental health policy.

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Volume 72, Issue 1 (pages 199–202)
Published in 1994