Notes on Contributors

Notes on Contributors

Emily K. Abel is associate professor at the School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles. Her most recent book is Who Cares for the Elderly? Public Policy and the Experiences of Adult Daughters. She is currently writing a history of family care for sick and disabled people in the United States.

Peter S. Arno is associate professor of health economics in the Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. His work has focused on the economic and financial impacts of the AIDS and TB epidemics and on regulation, innovation, and pricing practices of the pharmaceutical industry. He is a coauthor of Against the Odds: The Story of AIDS Drug Development Politics and Profits.

John Bound is associate professor of economics and associate research scientist at the Population Studies Center at the University of Michigan and a faculty research fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Re-search. His current research is on the economic and health status of U.S. minority populations and the effects of transfer programs on behavior and economic well-being. Mr. Bound is also studying the impact of changes in the wage structure over time and the validity of survey data.

Karen Bonuck is instructor of epidemiology and social medicine in the Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. Her research interests include issues of barriers to care among vulnerable populations, the relation between inadequate housing and health care utilization, and the economic factors associated with difficulties gaining access to prescription drugs. She recently completed her PhD dissertation on the unmet health service needs of persons with HIV and AIDS.

Michael Davis is a professor of law at Cleveland State University College of Law. Mr. Davis teaches and writes on intellectual property and health law both here and abroad. He is the author of texts and articles on health law and acts as intellectual property counsel in health law litigation, especially in the area of pharmaceuticals.

Kelly J. Devers is a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. She has been investigating variation in the organization of the intensive care unit and the effect of this variation on allocation of resources. Her current research includes the emergence of organized delivery systems, particularly as it affects hospital/physician relations.

Marvin Fischbaum is a professor of economics at Indiana State University, Terre Haute. He has written on the economic history of the pharmaceutical industry and is currently investigating the welfare implications of actual and hypothetical insurance markets.

Robin R. Gillies is assistant research professor at the Institute for Health Services and Policy Research, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. She has been involved in a study investigating integration of organized delivery systems. Ms. Gillies is also participating in a study to examine the impact on patient care of hospital efforts to improve quality.

Robert C. Guell is assistant professor of economics at Indiana State University, Terre Haute. In addition to his examination of pharmaceutical industry efficiency, he has published work on portfolio composition and on issues of intra-industry trade.

Rosalie A. Kane is a professor at the Institute for Health Services Research and director of the National Long-Term Care Resource Center, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota. Her research centers on the design and financing of long-term care for people with functional impairments and examines the topics of nursing-home care, home care, functional assessment, case management, family care, and quality assurance. Most recently, she has been studying ethics and values in long-term care and evaluating assisted living programs.

Michael Schoenbaum is a doctoral candidate in economics at the University of Michigan. He is interested in the determinants and consequences of individuals’ health status and in the health of populations. Recently, he has been examining the health status of the labor pool of older adults in the United States and Taiwan.

Stephen M. Shortell is A.C. Buehler Distinguished Professor of Health Services Management and professor of organization behavior at the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management and the Institute for Health Services and Policy Research, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. He is currently conducting research on the strategy, structure, and performance of integrated delivery systems and examining the implementation and impact of total quality management in health care organizations.

Timothy Waidmann is assistant professor at the School of Public Health and a research fellow of the Population Studies Center and Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan. Mr. Waidmann is interested in the economics and demography of aging. In his recent work, he has been examining the health and labor force activity of older minority populations and the effects of government transfer programs on their behavior and self-reported health.

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Volume 73, Issue 2 (pages 289–291)
Published in 1995