Notes on Contributors

Eric E. Fortess is Director of Health Administration Concentration, Department of Public Management, in the Frank Sawyer School of Management at Suffolk University in Boston. He is also a lecturer at the Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention at the Harvard Medical School and is on the staff of Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Brookline, Massachusetts. His research interests lie in health policy analysis, prevention, and technology. He is currently focusing on the impact of drug policy on vulnerable populations.

Paul K. Halverson is Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Administration and Senior Fellow at the Center for Public Health Practice, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He conducts research and instructs graduates in the areas of public health, managed care, and health system integration. Mr. Halverson’s interests are interorganizational alliances among public health agencies, managed care plans, and hospitals.

Arnold D. Kaluzny is a Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Administration, School of Public Health, and Senior Fellow in the Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Professor Kaluzny does research and instructs graduates in the topics of organizational design and health services behavior and management.

David M. Lawrence is Chairman and CEO of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc., and Kaiser Foundation Hospitals in Oakland, California. Dr. Lawrence is particularly interested in public health issues and the potential impact of well-designed programs on health status. He frequently lectures and writes on the advantages of nonprofit HMOs like Kaiser Permanente.

John M. Ludden is Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs at Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Brookline, Massachusetts. Dr. Ludden is interested in systems of accountability and measurement in health care and in national approaches to health care improvement.

Patrick H. Mattingly is Senior Vice President of Planning and Development at Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Brookline, Massachusetts. Dr. Mattingly is interested in the development of integrated systems that focus on improving health and in how leading organizations act to change health care in communities. He has recently worked on the strategy, policy, and plans for expanding Harvard Pilgrim Health Care.

Glen P. Mays is a Graduate Research Assistant in the Department of Health Policy and Administration and the Center for Public Health Practice, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As a student of health policy, Mr. Mays is pursuing research on managed care and its impact on local health systems.

Cameron A. Mustard is Associate Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg; Senior Researcher at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation; and an Associate of the Population Health Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. He is active in health services research in the areas of mental health, pediatric care, and obstetrics and in chronic disease epidemiology, particularly how socioeconomic disparities affect health status and the utilization of health services.

Thomas B. Richards is a Medical Officer in the Division of Public Health Systems, Public Health Practice Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Dr. Richards has extensively studied local public health agencies and has worked to develop systems for evaluating their performance.

Noralou P. Roos is a Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg; Director of the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation; a career scientist with the Research Programs Directorate of Health Canada; and an Associate of the Population Health Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. She is interested in issues related to needs-based planning for health services, the contribution of health care to health, and the use of administrative data for managing the health care system.

Dennis Ross-Degnan is Assistant Professor, Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School, and is on the staff of Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Brookline, Massachusetts. His interests include behavioral interventions to improve pharmaceutical use; the impact of cost-containment policies on drug use and clinical outcomes; and pharmaceutical policy in developing countries. He is one of the founders of the International Network for Rational Use of Drugs and is leading several studies on how interventions affect the use of medical drugs.

Mark Schlesinger is Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale School of Medicine, and Visiting Associate Research Professor at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University. Mr. Schlesinger’s current research is in three areas: the differences in how the American public and policy elites view social policy; the impact of the growth of managed care on professionalism in medicine and on aspects of health care that transcend clinical considerations; and the role of nonprofit ownership in the changing health care system.

Stephen B. Soumerai is Associate Professor of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, is Director of the Drug Policy Research Group at the Harvard Medical School, and is on the staff of Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Brookline, Massachusetts. Mr. Soumerai is concerned with the effects of educational interventions to improve clinical decisions and in the intended and unintended economic and health outcomes of cost-containment regulations. Currently he is principal investigator of a study by the National Institute of Drug Addiction on the impact of a statewide triplicate prescription policy on appropriate and inappropriate prescribing of benzodiazepines, patient behavior, clinical outcomes, and health care costs.

Bryan L. Walser is a former Research Associate at the Drug Policy Research Group, Harvard Medical School, and is on the staff of Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Brookline, Massachusetts. Currently he is a consultant in the Health Care Practice Interest Group at the Los Angeles office of the Boston Consulting Group. Dr. Walser’s interests lie in the medical, legal, and economic implications of changes in health care delivery systems, particularly as they affect international and domestic pharmaceutical policy.

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Volume 75, Issue 1 (pages 139–141)
DOI: 10.1111/1468-0009.00047
Published in 1997