Notes on Contributors

Julia Abelson is an assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and a member of the Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. Her research interests include public involvement and governance issues in health systems decision making; the evaluation of innovations in the organization, funding, and delivery of health services; and the analysis of health and health care policy decision making. She has worked closely with decision makers at provincial, regional, and local government levels and is a board member of the newly founded Regionalization Research Centre.

John Chapin is a state health officer and administrator in the Division of Public Health of the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services.

Dov Chernichovsky is a professor of health economics and policy at the Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, and a researcher at the National Bureau of Economic Research, United States. Research interests include health system finance, organization and management, provider reimbursement, public policy in health care, and public-private mix. He serves on a special commission appointed by the government of Israel to examine the Israeli health system and the status of the Israeli physician. He heads the health team of the Israel’s Center for Social Policy and was a member of the Israeli state commission that led to the national health insurance legislation enacted in Israel in 1995.

Bruce Fetter is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. After 25 years’ work on the social history of Africa, his interests turned to demography, as a means of understanding the effects of colonial rule and of putting the African experience in a wider context. He now addresses the role of human agency in mortality reduction, a problem that embraces biomedical sciences, ethnomedicine, and the politics and delivery of health care.

Joanne M. Hohenadel is a research associate in the Program on eHealth Innovation, University Health Network, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Her recent projects have focused on research transfer and evidence-based decision-making across the continuum of health care (i.e., policymakers, administrators, practitioners, consumers, and the media) with emphasis on the potential for technology to help stakeholders access, understand, and use evidence when making health decisions.

Jeremiah E. Hurley is professor, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis and Department of Economics at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. His current research work includes the examination of public and private roles in health care financing, policy issues surrounding the use of capitation funding, funding models for home care services, physician responses to payment systems, and values in Canadian health policymaking.

John N. Lavis is assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and a member of the Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario; Canada Research Chair in Knowledge Transfer and Uptake; Liberty Health Scholar at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research; and a scientist at the Institute for Work & Health. In the past year he has launched a new research program in policy decision-making, which involves the study of knowledge transfer and uptake in public policy-making environments. He continues to conduct research on the social determinants of health (especially the links between labor-market experiences and health) and on health care systems.

Richard A. Miller is professor of pathology at the University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, and associate director of the Geriatrics Center. In addition, he is a research scientist at the Ann Arbor DVA Medical Center and senior research scientist at the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Michigan. He and his laboratory team study the genetics of aging in mice. The laboratory group maps genes that regulate the longevity and immune function and develops new mouse lines with extended longevity, in the hope that these will provide clues to the mechanisms that regulate aging rate in mammals.

Marsha Rosenthal is a graduate assistant at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research and in the Department of Sociology, Rutgers University. Her primary health research interest is doctor-patient relationships, especially changes under managed care. Other recent work focuses on developing a sociological theory of blame attribution, and on trust in health care settings. Much of her work focuses on vulnerable populations, including the mentally ill, the chronically ill, and the elderly.

Suzanne E. Ross is a research associate at the Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. She co-directs the Program in Policy Decision-making, which is devoted to increasing understanding of the transfer and uptake of knowledge in policymaking environments. She is particularly interested in improving our understanding of the public policy decision-making process, including the different ways in which public policy decisions and decision-making contexts can be categorized.

Mark Schlesinger is associate professor of public health and fellow of the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale University. He is also a visiting research professor at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University. He was previously on the faculty at the Kennedy School of Government and Harvard Medical School. His research includes analyzing the understanding and attitudes that the general public and policy elites bring to health and social policy; studies of the impact of legal ownership on organizational behavior; and investigations of the consequences of institutional change in American medicine for consumer behaviors as well as the ethical norms and practices of medical professionals.

Gregory L. Stoddart is a professor at the Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario; and fellow in the Population Health Program, Canada Institute for Advanced Research. Past research has addressed topics from the economics of health and health care systems, including the public-private mix in health care financing, social determinants of health, and intersectoral resource allocation for health. Recent research focuses on knowledge transfer and uptake in policymaking environments, and is being conducted within a new research program in policy decision-making at McMaster University.

Christel A. Woodward is a professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and a member of the Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Her interests include health provider behavior; health human resource planning and utilization; and evaluation of health and health care programs and primary and community health care delivery. Current research involves examining aspects of care continuity important in home care; evaluation and introduction of an extended-role pharmacist into primary care physician practices; and the effects of greater care continuity on vulnerable elderly.

Read on Wiley Online Library

Read on JSTOR

Volume 80, Issue 1 (pages 175–178)
DOI: 10.1111/1468-0009.00007
Published in 2002