Notes on Contributors

Scott M. Bilder is a research analyst at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, in New Brunswick. He is interested in the consequences of mental illness for persons’ work and educational attainment as well as health care access and usage for persons with serious mental illness.

Richard A. Cooper is professor of medicine and health policy and director of the Health Policy Institute at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. His interests center on the workforce of physicians and nonphysician clinicians. He recently developed the “Trend Model” for predicting physician supply and utilization, a model that is built around long-term economic and demographic trends, and he currently is examining the demographic trends that predict who tomorrow’s health care providers are likely to be.

Dan Crippen is the immediate past director of the Congressional Budget Office, Washington, D.C.

Linda E. Fishman is currently Health Policy Director for the U.S. Senate Finance Committee under the chairmanship of Senator Chuck Grassley (R., IA). Her responsibilities include overall development, coordination, and management of the health care agenda for the committee, including the Medicare, Medicaid, and State Children’s Health Insurance Programs as well as policies to address the uninsured and long-term care. She has also served as professional staff for Representative Bill Thomas (R., CA) when he was Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, and played a key role in developing two major pieces of Medicare legislation: BBRA of 1999 and BIPA of 2000.

Sherry Glied is professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York. Her principal areas of interest are the financing of health care services in the United States and mental health policy. Her recent work on health care financing has focused on the evaluation of alternative options for expanding coverage to the uninsured, including the determinants of program participation and efficiency. She is also working on a project (with Richard Frank) assessing changes in the well-being of people with mental illness over the past five decades.

Joshua Graff Zivin is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Mailman School of Public Health and the International Center for Health Outcomes and Innovation Research at Columbia University in New York. He is an environmental and health economist whose work includes environmental quality management through both voluntary and legal actions as well as through environmental regulation and public health programs; innovation and adoption of medical technologies; measuring the economic value of health interventions; and contracting between physicians, patients, and insurers.

Gerald Markowitz is adjunct professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York. He is also professor of history at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the CUNY Graduate Center. He has been awarded numerous grants, including those from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and was a recipient of the Viseltear Prize from the Medical Care Section of the American Public Health Association for “Outstanding Contributions” to the history of public health. His most recent book, written with David Rosner, is Deceit and Denial: The Deadly Politics of Industrial Pollution (Milbank Memorial Fund and University of California Press 2002).

Heather J. McKee was a research associate at the Health Policy Institute of the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee when this article was prepared. Her interests center on systems of care. She recently moved to the Department of Health Care Policy at the Harvard Medical School, where she is collaborating on projects that assess the impact of different characteristics of physicians and health care organizations on the provision of health care services.

David Mechanic is the René Dubos University Professor of Behavioral Sciences and director of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, in New Brunswick. His research and writing deal with social aspects of health and health care.

David Nexon is Minority Staff Director for Health for the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee and Senior Health Policy Advisor to Senator Edward M. Kennedy (D., MA). He has served in those or similar capacities for the HELP Committee and its predecessor, the Labor and Human Resources Committee, since 1983. From 1977 to 1983, he was a Senior Budget Examiner in the Office of Management and Budget, Executive Office of the President, where he was responsible for the Health Care Financing Administration. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago.

Ellen O’Brien is a research assistant professor at the Institute for Health Care Research and Policy, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. Her main research interests include health care financing, economic inequality and health insurance coverage, and access to care for the uninsured. She is currently working on a project comparing trends in health insurance coverage during the most recent business cycle downturn to past recessions.

Mark V. Pauly is professor of health care systems and of economics at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. For more than ten years, he has been developing and analyzing proposals to use tax credits to reduce the number of uninsured.

Dahlia K. Remler is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Mailman School of Pubic Health at Columbia University in New York. She is an economist whose work has focused on many areas, including how managed care techniques affect physicians; the sources and benefits of medical care cost growth, particularly technological change; whether the less healthy respond to cost-sharing differently; methods for modeling the impact of policies to expand insurance; payment methods for adopting and incentives to adopt information technology in medical care services; and the relationship between internal incentives in academia and the market for professional education services.

David Rosner is professor of history and public health at Columbia University in New York and director of the Center for the History of Public Health at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health. In addition to numerous grants, he has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, and a Josiah Macy Fellow. He has been awarded the Distinguished Scholar’s Prize from the City University of New York and recently, the Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Work in the History of Public Health from the American Public Health Association. His most recent book, written with Gerald Markowitz, is Deceit and Denial: The Deadly Politics of Industrial Pollution (Milbank Memorial Fund and University of California Press 2002).

John Sheils is vice president at the Lewin Group in Falls Church, Virginia. He is the architect of the Lewin Group Health Benefits Simulation Model (HBSM), which is designed to estimate the impact of major health reform initiatives. He has used the model to assist numerous state and federal policymakers in assessing the coverage and cost impacts of health reform initiatives such as the SCHIP program and the president’s comprehensive health reform proposal of 1993.

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Volume 81, Issue 1 (pages 169–172)
DOI: 10.1111/1468-0009.t01-2-00048
Published in 2003