Notes on Contributors

Karen M. Bell is director of the Office of IT Adoption for the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology at the Department of Health and Human Services. She holds an MD and an MMS. Previously, Bell practiced internal medicine with Partners Health Care and Harvard Community Health Plan and led efforts by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to implement information technology in physicians’ offices. She has also held health director positions with the Monroe County Department of Public Health in Rochester, New York.

Randall R. Bovbjerg is a principal research associate in the Health Policy Center of the Urban Institute in Washington, DC. He has over thirty years of research and practical experience in public and private insurance; state and local health policy; medical injury, liability, and reform; safety-net issues; and state regulation. Trained as a lawyer, earlier in his career he was an insurance regulator as well as a volunteer health planner. He has published extensively and has recently served on the District of Columbia Health Services Reform Commission (2001–2003), JCAHO’s taskforce on alternatives to tort litigation (2004–2005), and the Federation of State Medical Boards’ taskforce on patient safety (2005–). He has taught courses for Duke, Johns Hopkins, and the University of Maryland–Baltimore County.

Michael H. Boyle is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University and a member of the Offord Centre for Child Studies. He obtained a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Toronto and holds a Canada Research Chair in the Social Determinants of Child Health. He studies contextual influences on development over the early life course.

Peter C. Coyte is a professor of health economics and a CHSRF/CIHR Health Services Research Chair in the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Coyte is a national and international expert in the areas of health economics, health services evaluation, and health policy and planning. His studies have included the measurement of regional variations in health service utilization, evaluations of the cost-effective provision of health care services, and assessments of health service finance, organization, and delivery. Coyte holds a PhD.

Raisa Deber is a professor in the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Deber received her PhD in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She directs the M-THAC (Medicare to Home and Community) research unit and the CIHR Team in Community Care and Health Human Resources. She has lectured and published extensively on Canadian health policy; advised numerous local, provincial, national, and international bodies; and served on editorial boards and review panels.

Anne K. Gauthier is senior policy director of the Commonwealth Fund’s Commission on a High Performance Health System, based at AcademyHealth in Washington, DC. She has a long history in health policy with a focus on providing decision makers with good, reliable information to make better policy, including directing a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation research program, working with states on initiatives to expand coverage, and leading studies for the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. A graduate of Princeton University, she also holds an MS in health administration from the University of Massachusetts.

Ellen Jamieson works as a research associate for the Violence Against Women research program at McMaster University, focusing on data analysis and report preparation. Jamieson has a master’s degree in education.

Stephen F. Jencks is senior clinical advisor for the Office of Clinical Standards and Quality at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Jencks has an MD and MPH.

Robert T. Kambic is retired from the faculty of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, but remains a visiting scientist at the university in informatics for the School of Medicine. He has numerous publications in the area of health services research from worldwide projects and has been a consultant and an advisor on evaluation, population, demography, and informatics to diverse organizations, including the Roman Catholic Pontifical Council on the Family, the Government of Uganda, Yale University, NIH, AHRQ, and Planned Parenthood. He is currently a senior health informatics advisor at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Kambic has a master’s degree from the University of Pittsburgh.

Meredith L. Kilgore is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Care Organization and Policy and a scholar for the Lister Hill Center for Health Policy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). He holds a nursing degree from the University of Hawaii, an MSPH from UAB, and a PhD in policy analysis from the Pardee RAND Graduate School. His research interests include burden of disease and treatment for cancer, osteoporosis and other chronic conditions, as well as long-term care for older adults.

Mary Jane Koren is an assistant vice president at the Commonwealth Fund and leads the Picker/Commonwealth Program on Quality of Care for Frail Elders. Koren, a geriatrician, cofounded the Montefiore Medical Center’s Geriatric Fellowship Program and later was the associate chief of staff for extended care at the Bronx VA Medical Center. She subsequently was the director of the New York State Department of Health’s Bureau of Long-Term Care Services. Throughout her career she has been active as a health services researcher in the area of long-term care quality.

Audrey Laporte is an assistant professor of health economics in the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. She holds a PhD in economics from the University of Guelph. Laporte’s research includes investigations into the role of provider profit status on efficiency and quality of care in the nursing home and community care sectors, and modeling of determinants of nursing labor supply across different care settings. Most recently, Laporte has investigated the impact of social capital on health care utilization by the elderly.

Gregory Lodenquai completed medical school at the University of Ottawa in 1998 and residency at McMaster University in 2003. He became a member of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in 2003 and completed a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Toronto in 2005. Lodenquai is currently a staff psychiatrist at the Hincks Dellcrest Centre in Toronto and a faculty member of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Toronto (lecturer status pending). His areas of interest include psychopharmacology, cognitive behavioral therapy, and child maltreatment.

Joanne Lynn serves as a medical officer in the Office of Clinical Standards and Quality for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. She holds an MD, MA, and MS and has been a senior researcher at RAND and a professor of medicine at both Dartmouth Medical School and George Washington University. Her team has recently published a clinician manual for quality improvement, The Common Sense Guide to Improving Palliative Care (Oxford University Press, 2007), which joins a policy action guide, Sick to Death and Not Going to Take It Anymore! (University of California Press and the Milbank Memorial Fund, 2004), and a helpful guide for the public,The Handbook for Mortals (Oxford University Press, 1999).

Harriet L. MacMillan, a member of the Offord Centre for Child Studies, is a psychiatrist and pediatrician conducting research on the epidemiology and prevention of violence against children and women. She is a professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences and Pediatrics at McMaster University. MacMillan has an MD and an MSc, is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and holds the David R. (Dan) Offord Chair in Child Studies.

Kathleen Montgomery is professor of organizations and management in the A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Riverside. She also is visiting professor at the University of Sydney’s Centre for Values, Ethics, and the Law in Medicine and has held previous visiting appointments at Stanford and UCLA. Montgomery received her PhD in sociology from New York University. For several years she served as an elected officer, including chair of the Health Care Management Division of the Academy of Management. Montgomery’s research analyzes relationships between health care professionals and organizations. Recent research examines the dynamics of trust and integrity among professionals and organizational stakeholders.

Michael A. Morrisey is a professor of health economics and health insurance in the Department of Health Care Organization and Policy of the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and is director of the UAB Lister Hill Center for Health Policy. He holds a BA from Northern State University and a PhD in economics from the University of Washington. His research interests include the effects of legislation and regulation on health and health care, employer-sponsored health insurance, and hospital markets. His recent work on regulatory issues has appeared in Inquiry, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Health Economics.

Leonard J. Nelson III is a professor at the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama, where he teaches torts and health law. He is also a senior scholar with the Lister Hill Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and teaches a course in public health law at the UAB School of Public Health. Nelson has his BA from the University of Washington, JD from Gonzaga University, and LLM from Yale Law School. He has written articles on a variety of topics related to health care law, which have been published in peer-reviewed journals and law reviews.

Jeffrey O’Connell is the Samuel H. McCoy II Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, specializing in accident and insurance law. He is a coauthor of the principal work that proposed no-fault auto insurance. O’Connell has been a recipient of two Guggenheim Fellowships and was awarded a Convocation Medal by the American College of Cardiology for his published research on reform of medical malpractice law. In December 1999, The American Lawyer listed O’Connell as likely to be viewed as one of “The Lawyers of the Century” based on his work reforming tort law. O’Connell is the author or coauthor of twelve books dealing with accident law. His latest book from Yale University Press, coauthored with Peter Bell, is entitled Accidental Justice: The Dilemmas of Tort Law.

John Omura is in his final year of medical school at the University of Western Ontario. In July of 2007 he will begin pediatrics residency training at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. At present, he holds a BHSc degree from McMaster University.

Greg Payne is a PhD candidate specializing in health economics at the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He has a master’s degree in economics, also from the University of Toronto, has extensive experience working in the financial services industry, and has had letters to the editor published in The New Yorker, The Economist, and Barron’s Magazine. In addition to his current studies, he consults on health care policy to the government of Ontario with an emphasis on resource planning for long-term care.

Eugene S. Schneller is professor and director of the Health Sector Supply Chain Research Consortium in the School of Health Management and Policy at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. He received his PhD from New York University’s Department of Sociology and an honorary physician assistant (PA) degree from Duke University in 2004 in recognition of his research on the emergence and development of the PA occupation. Previous academic appointments were at Duke and at Union College (Schenectady). He was a research scholar for the Conservation for Human Resources at Columbia University. His recent books include Strategic Management of the Health Sector Supply Chain (2006) and Managing Change in the Public Services (2007).

Stephen C. Schoenbaum is executive vice president for programs at the Commonwealth Fund and executive director of its Commission on a High Performance Health System. Schoenbaum has done extensive epidemiologic research and held several management positions in an HMO (Harvard Community Health Plan). He has an MD and MPH.

Barry M. Straube is director of the Office of Clinical Standards and Quality (OCSQ) and chief medical officer at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). He oversees the CMS quality and clinical policy portfolio, including national coverage policies and quality standards for Medicare and Medicaid; quality measurement and public reporting; and the Quality Improvement Organization program. Straube is senior advisor to the CMS administrator on clinical and scientific policy. He received his MD from the University of Michigan Medical School, completed an internal medicine residency at California Pacific Medical Center, and served as a Renal Fellow at Tufts University–New England Medical Center. He is board-certified in internal medicine and nephrology.

Jason M. Walker is a Canadian health care executive and head of staff for the Glengarry Hospital in Victoria, British Columbia. He has an extensive history in the field of child maltreatment as a frontline child protection worker and administrator. Currently, Walker is a member of the adjunct faculty at the University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine and at the University of Victoria in the Department of Medicine and the School of Child and Youth Care. Walker has a PhD and CHE.

Christine A. Walsh has a PhD in social work from the University of Toronto. She holds an academic appointment as an assistant professor in the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Calgary. Her current research interests include the examination of violence across the life span and community development related to issues of poverty and homelessness.

C. Nadine Wathen is assistant professor in the Faculty of Information Studies at the University of Toronto. Her research examines health decision making, particularly in the areas of women’s health and of violence against women and children. She has extensive experience in systematic evidence reviews, development of clinical practice guidelines, and knowledge translation and exchange to a variety of stakeholder audiences, including policymakers, health care providers, advocates, and the public. She also examines the use of new media in the knowledge translation process. Wathen holds a PhD.

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Volume 85, Issue 2 (pages 375–381)
DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0009.2007.00491.x
Published in 2007